Remembering with org-mode and Ubiquity

Yesterday evening I published my second set of Ubiquity commands which provide a Ubiquity interface between Firefox and Emacs — specifically org-mode — using org-protocol. Ubiquity is an experimental extension from Mozilla Labs that lets you interact with the browser by giving it short, plain text commands. For example, “share” to post a bookmark to Delicious, or “map” to open a map of the selected address.

Org-Mode is an Emacs mode that can be used to keep track of notes, agendas and task lists. I use it to maintain my task list for various projects and take notes when I’m in a meeting. I really like that while it’s an outline editor at heart, it lets me write lots of text and go back later and figure out what’s actually actionable, as opposed to maintaining separate notes and task lists. org-protocol is included in recent releases and lets you launch an instance of emacsclient with some additional information (i.e., the URL and title of a web page, etc) and take some action on it. One of the built in “protocols” is sending that information to remember mode, which org-mode augments.

The main command is simply remember. Invoking it will send the current URL and document title to org-mode’s Remember buffer. You can optionally type a note or select text in the page to be captured along with the link.

Once you’re in the buffer you can make any changes needed and then simply C-c C-c to save the note, or C-1 C-c C-c to interactively file the note someplace else. I’m using this command to quickly store links with some notes to project files. I hope this will be particularly useful when I run across something for a project I’m not actually able to spend time on at the moment.

Note that before using the commands you need to configure Firefox to understand org-protocol:// links, and need to configure a remember template. The template I use looks like:

(?w "* %?\n\n  Source: %u, %c\n\n  %i" nil "Notes")

This store the information in the Notes section of my org-default-notes-file and positions the cursor ready to type a heading.

To install, visit the command page and click “Subscribe”in the upper right hand corner when prompted (this assumes you have Ubiquity already installed). You can find the Javascript source on gitorious; I’ll be adding my RDFa commands to that repository as well.

date:2009-10-07 12:52:04
wordpress_id:1186
layout:post
slug:remembering-with-org-mode-and-ubiquity
comments:
category:development, geek
tags:emacs, firefox, mozilla, orgmode, ubiquity

RDFa Bookmarklets for Ubiquity

I’ve been aware of Ubiquity since it launched and have meant to dig in and play with it for a while. I’m becoming increasingly reliant on my keyboard for fast interaction with the computer; I blame gnome-do. So using the keyboard to interact more quickly with my browser had a lot of appeal.

Today I finally installed Ubiquity 0.5 and looked at converting the RDFa bookmarklets to Ubiquity commands. The bookmarklets are invaluable for debugging and exploring RDFa, but I don’t use them often enough to feel like I want them on my bookmark bar all the time.

Turns out that Ubiquity makes it really easy to convert a bookmarklet to a command. I’ve converted the Get N3 and RDFa Highlight bookmarklets and made them available. I’d like to convert the fragment parser as well but I think that’ll be a little more involved.

To use the commands, just install Ubiquity 0.5 (or later for you visitors from the future) and visit the commands page. You’ll see a notification at the top of the browser window asking if you’d like to install the commands.

date:2009-07-11 09:58:28
wordpress_id:1054
layout:post
slug:rdfa-bookmarklets-for-ubiquity
comments:
category:development, geek, projects
tags:firefox, javascript, rdfa, ubiquity