Draft Work: “Fast Pass”

Fast Pass, copyright 2013 Nathan Yergler

3” x 5” two plate linocut print

Last week when I was printing my line study, I had a couple extra hours in the studio. I’d previously drawn the plates for a Fast Pass double-plate print, so I quickly carved it as a fun distraction. The Fast Pass was the SFMTA monthly pass card when I moved to San Francisco in 2007. It’s since been supplanted by Clipper, but most of my friends have some emotional attachment to the Fast Pass. You had to get a new one every month, and the colors changed each time, often appearing almost seasonable. I have a collection of the Fast Passes that passed through my hands, and it seems like I’m not alone.

As a draft print that took about 90 minutes to carve, I’m happy with the result. I’m particularly happy with how the MUNI logos came out. This is one of the first prints I’ve done with text on it, so I think the next thing I’d like to work on is cleaning up the text carving a bit.

author:Nathan Yergler
category:printmaking
tags:linocut, multiplate, text, postive-negative
comments:

New Work: “Welcome Home”

Welcome Home”, copyright 2013 Nathan Yergler

5” x 7” two plate linocut print, printed on Rives BFK

Richard and I just moved from South Beach back to the area I lived in when I first moved to San Francisco, and we first started dating. We’ve been in the new place for a couple weeks now, and it already feels like we’re more in the city than we were before: closer to friends, closer to things to do in the evenings, and more in a neighborhood. I was in the studio on a Wednesday evening, just days before we moved, and I wanted to commemorate our new home. This is what came out. It’s not a literal drawing of the front gate and building, but it sort of takes the elements and rearranges them a bit. It’s one of the first things I’ve done where I just drew directly on the plate before carving, instead of doing a drawing first. Of course, I forgot to reverse it, so I still wound up tracing what I’d drawn, cleaning off the plates, and then re-drawing it. Sigh.

author:Nathan Yergler
category:printmaking
tags:linocut, multiplate
comments:

New Work: Untitled (Bay Bridge)

Untitled (Bay Bridge)”, copyright 2013, Nathan Yergler

8” x 10” four plate linocut print, printed on Rives BFK

Shortly after I finished “Golden Gate” last year I decided I needed to do a companion piece depicting the other bridge in San Francisco. I pulled the first prints of the new piece on Wednesday, and I think it’s pretty interesting how it turned out. Just like on “Golden Gate”, I tried to stretch technically. One of the plates — the sky and water — is cut in two so I could ink the gradient the way I wanted to. When carving the water I limited myself to a rounded edge carving tool to try and make it more “shimmering”. And the cables on the bridge are represented using carved lines against the sky. All three experiments feel pretty successful to me.

When I was printing “Days Getting Shorter“, I experienced how much fun printing multiplate prints can be when the registration is loose. The loose registration on those plates meant that I could focus on inking, colors, and other things, and the registration just sort of happened. The registration on this piece is much tighter, and of the five I printed I only got one where it’s really right on. But even the ones where’s it’s a little off don’t feel like failures to me: I think because there’s so much going on, it’s easy to enjoy other parts of the image. And working on tight registration is something I can practice in upcoming work.

author:Nathan Yergler
category:printmaking
tags:linocut, multiplate
comments:

New Work: Days Getting Shorter

Days Getting Shorter”, copyright 2013, Nathan Yergler

8” x 10” Two Plate Linocut, printed on Rives BFK

This was a fun piece to work on. It’s based on this photo (used with permission, albeit after the fact), which I’ve been staring at off and on for months. The most interesting thing to me is how the rainbow roll turned out (the gradient in the image). The ink at the top is a magenta with a little blue in it, and the ink at the bottom is mostly opaque white, with a little black in it to make it about the color of concrete or pavement. But the black shadow at the bottom masks most of the pure gray color, and the opaque white in the gray seems to really bring out the blue that’s in the magenta. Totally unexpected, but very pleasing to my eye.

author:Nathan Yergler
category:printmaking
tags:linocut, multiplate
comments: